Courses Offered

Please consult our Quick Guide for Minors for the course offered in prerequisite tracks.

Professional Writing

Writing 30 (Introduction to Professional Writing): Writing for business, including practice in technical writing, professional correspondence, public relations, and journalistic contexts.  WRI 30 is a pre-requisite for upper-division professional writing coursework.

Writing 90 (Intersections of Creative and Professional Writing):  This course offers opportunities to reflect on fundamental activities that benefit multiple genres of writing.  While traditional writing courses are product-driven ("you willl learn to write a poem," "you will learn to write a marketing analysis," "you will learn to write an academic essay"), WRI 90 focuses instead on understanding and practicing compositional strategies -- like brainstorming, using metaphor, imagination exercises, adapting and translating, narrating, auditioning concepts, and collaborating -- foundational to many forms of written expression.  WRI 90 is the prerequisite for upper-division minor program tracked coursework.

Writing 130 (Topics in Professional Writing): Specialized, practical instruction in one aspect of professional writing, considering important factors such as clarity, tone, audience, ethics, and context. Topics include (but are not limited to) journalism, writing for digital media, technical writing, copy-editing, writing for the Internet, and research for writers. With instructor permission, this course can be repeated for credit as topics change.  WRI 30 and WRI 90 are pre-requisites for this course.  This course can be repeated as topics change.

Writing 155 (Seminar in Professional Writing): This advanced seminar is based on case studies representing different contexts of professional writing. Specific attention is devoted to technical writing for the representation of complex information in a form that is accessible to general readers. Elements of translation theory will also be reviewed.  WRI 130 is pre-requisite for this course.

Writing 160 (Seminar in Editing): This workshop course examines grammar and style, documentation, manuscript solicitation, selection and review, as well as generating manuscripts. Concerns fundamental to editing—such as consistency of voice, integrity of the author’s concepts, and use of multiple languages—are included as part of the editorial process. WRI 150 or WRI 155 are pre-requisites for this course.

Creative Writing

Writing 25 (Introduction to Creative Writing): Workshop-oriented instruction in the artistic nuances of literary genres such as fiction and poetry. Wri 25 is a prerequisite for upper-division creative writing coursework.

Writing 90 (Intersections of Creative and Professional Writing):  This course offers opportunities to reflect on fundamental activities that benefit multiple genres of writing.  While traditional writing courses are product-driven ("you will learn to write a poem," "you will learn to write a marketing analysis," "you will learn to write an academic essay"), WRI 90 focuses instead on understanding and practicing compositional strategies -- like brainstorming, using metaphor, imagination exercises, adapting and translating, narrating, auditioning concepts, and collaborating -- foundational to many forms of written expression.  WRI 90 is the prerequisite for upper-division minor program tracked coursework.

Writing 125 (Advanced Creative Writing): Advanced work in creative writing, with each section focusing on one genre: poetry, fiction, drama, or creative nonfiction. The course follows a workshop format.  Prerequisite for the course is passage of WRI 25 and WRI 90.  This course can be repeated for credit as topics change.

Writing 150 (Seminar in Creative Writing): In this advanced workshop students produce creative and critical work in one of the following genres: fiction, playwriting, poetry, or creative nonfiction.  WRI 125 is the pre-requisite for this course.  This course can be repeated as topics change.

Writing 160 (Seminar in Editing): This workshop course examines grammar and style, documentation, manuscript solicitation, selection and review, as well as generating manuscripts. Concerns fundamental to editing—such as consistency of voice, integrity of the author’s concepts, and use of multiple languages—are included as part of the editorial process. WRI 150 or WRI 155 are pre-requisites for this course.

Other Course Offerings

The following courses require ony WRI 10 as a pre-requisite

Writing 40 (Humanities Writing):  Rhetorical conventions in history, the arts, and literature will be introduced with opportunity to practice writing in humanities genres and explore stylistic mediums, analytical strategies andresearch methods in the humanities.

Writing 100: This course will emphasize development of style, voice and syntax within writing projects. As a pre-professional writing course, it will include readings and writing in creative non-fiction as well as writing for popular and academic periodicals. 

Writing 105 (Grammar and Style): Introduction to basic principles of language study, including the key distinction between classifying and explaining grammatical forms and functions. Building on such grammatical principles, students analyze texts of various genres and formats, ranging from literary to conversational to disciplinary discourse.

Writing 110 (Tutoring in Writing): Introduction to writing pedagogy and methods for students training to work effectively with peers to improve student learning.

Writing 111 (Course-Embedded Tutor Training): Provides oppportunities to engage in reflective practices, review of composition theory, and research peer education pedagogy to gain experience tutoring and assisting in classroom and consultative support to entry-level writers.  Students reflect and synthesize through readings, reflective journals, writing projects and a practicum.

Writing 114 (Environmental Writing): Technical, scientific, policy, journalistic, and nonfiction writing focused on environmental science, with potential applications in environmental research, advocacy, and art, this course provides explores environment through description, argument, journalism, bibliography, grant proposal, and essay.

Writing 120 (Rhetorical Theory): Intensive study in classical and contemporary theories of written rhetoric. The course enables students to analyze, criticize and deploy rhetorical strategies via readings in rhetorical theory, application of theory to the criticism of texts, and the imitation and production of arguments.

Writing 121 (International Rhetoric): Focused on non-Western authors writing in English (and sometimes in translation), students will identify and analyze various cultural contexts that shape rhetorical choices and styles.  Centered on one or two specific geographic regions, historical moments, or genres, this course fosters critical engagement with rhetorical analysis, linguistic adaptations, and composition styles.

Writing 131 (Undergraduate Research Journal): This course applies advanced writing and editing skills to the production of the Undergraduate Research Journal. Addresses the editorial analysis of texts, principles of revision, research guidelines, technical communication, and web design specific to research writing and journal production.

Writing 140 (Topics in Ethnic Writing): Students refine their abilities to analyze, synthesize, apply, and explain complex rhetorical forms for appropriate audiences while engaging in intensive study in theories of oral and written rhetoric related to Chicana/o rhetorical discourses. The course emphasizes readings in rhetorical theory, criticism, and formal argument. Students will also submit a cumulative writing portfolio.

 

Note regarding writing courses in the disciplines:  WRI 101 (Writing for Psychology), WRI 112 (Writing for the Arts), WRI 116 (Writing for the Natural Sciences), WRI 117 (Writing for the Humanities), WRI 118 (Management Communication), and WRI 119 (Writing for Engineering) count as an upper-division course for a minor if not already used to fulfill another GE or school requirement.  Check with your advisor.